Mlamba Collins

I was born outside the Coastal region but I have spent most of my time in Kilifi; it’s literally the place where I have been raised. I currently reside in Makao area.
I am the second child in a family of four with two of the greatest parents one could ask for – you can take my word on that.
I undertook my primary academic journey through three different primary schools and did the same also for my secondary education.
I will be joining The University of Nairobi to pursue Bachelor of Science (Biosystems Engineering).
My motivation statement is for a winner the laws of physics are just but a mere suggestion: only you can stop yourself. Success is simply making the best out of yourself.

My role model is Bazil Masabo-Kenyatta university Bio-medical engineering student

Personal Blog
My experience has been really amazing and wonderful here at the program under the SLAS. Let me give you a sneak preview of the departments I visited.
Community Liaison Group (CLG): This was my very first stop and it did not disappoint. I got to meet a few of the community members as well as got engaged in planning for meetings to dispense knowledge to selected community groups concerning KEMRI and what it does. I will not fail to mention that I really enjoyed the trips to the field.
EDD: My experience here was simply building up on all that I learned in the CLG. I got to the nitty gritties of various studies that are undertaken in the program. There are many studies so to speak and a lot of effort is required to undertake all the tasks involved. One thing that caught my attention is the dedication of the people to their work. They also have a mastery of what they are doing so that they can break it down even to a five year old and he would not miss a point. I enjoyed the one-on-one sessions with different professionals in their specializations – one of my best motivating sessions.
LABS: I put on a pair of gloves and a lab coat and got down to the business of interacting with viruses, bacteria and parasites in their different stages of development. I must say time ran out for me because there was a lot to learn. Whatever my high school biology teacher had just given to me in theory was emphasized practically in the labs. I also learnt of what happens between taking of samples in a health facility to the giving of a prescription by a medical officer – it’s quite a lot if you want to know.
IT: Here is where my interest rests. Two weeks was just not enough for me. I am sure a month or so would have been adequate and I would still ask for more. For me programming was most interesting. How one builds up a website or application right from scratch. This place was the best in my entire stay at the program. It sealed my interest and love for computers and all that comes with it. I also enjoyed the fact that technology is changing quite fast and anyone is welcome to be part of the change. I loved the department.
WARDS: It was the last and I had great expectations but it was such a disappointment. Nurses were on srike so there was very little activity in the wards. Still I will not fail to mention that it requires a big and strong heart for one to serve in this department; other than the pharmacy – because you only have drugs to deal with. I will confess that the HDU freaked me out and I decide medicine was a calling but not for me. A lot of care, scrutiny, dedication, love and humanity was all I could smell in the very air of the wards where kids were in pain. What a way to end my rounds!

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